Try: Using the Phrase "Don't Compare"

comparing yourself to others

Since you're a human being and you're alive in 2017, I'm guessing you're aware of the "comparing yourself" problem. You know, the situation where a person wastes time worrying that their neighbor/friend/coworker has a better life / things more figured out / a better job than they do?

It's a cancerous thought problem, and this experiment is meant to tackle it head-on.

You're hearing this from the frontlines: it's possible to dent the "comparing" problem.

Change the habit.

I've lessened the amount that I compare myself to others in the past three years by building on my mental habit. At first it took brute force. Over time it has gotten easier and more natural. Here's how it works: If I feel my mind start to bend toward comparison, I literally say the following two words to myself,

DON'T COMPARE.

 I then think about how I couldn’t live like others even if I wanted to.

Keep it simple, build the muscle.

It can be very hard to put theoreticals into action. That's why this experiment really is just about saying these words aloud to yourself:

“Don’t compare.” “Don’t compare.”

I hope this experiment works for you! Sending you good, non-comparison thoughts.

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Try: Creating a Bullet Journal

bullet journal stress relief

I learned about bullet journals from the good people of the Beautiful Voyager Slack channel. I am looking forward to trying this experiment out myself, and can see why the people who have written about this are so obsessed. The best description of how bullet journals work is definitely this in-depth, fully-illustrated Buzzfeed post

If this experiment works for you, hit the heart to let others know they should give it a try!

Try: Tackling One Item From Your "Should" List

should list

This one is pretty unappealing. I know that. How? Because I know you. Because I AM you. I wouldn't want to do anything from my should list either. You think I want to go over to that set of papers on the desk and look at summer camp options for my daughter (why are they only one week long? why so much planning? it's like a matrix of options over there). Or even worse, the pile of bills. But this is on the list for a reason. Doing just one thing on the list will make you feel better and could change the momentum of your day. It's not about doing everything. It's about doing one thing. And then, maybe, one more thing. 

If this experiment works for you, hit the heart to let others know they should give it a try!

Try to: Structure Your Eating

fix disordered eating

This one came from Abdullah Alhomoud, whose essay is part of the Beautiful Voyager Medium publication. He says,

I work out, so I eat to build muscle. Seeing direct results from eating means I will keep eating enough and eating right. It gives me control over something I can control (my body), which helps with anxiety.

Disordered eating is an umbrella term that refers to a variety of eating behaviors. The experiment here is to try to create regularity and structure in your eating. Set clear goals, and remove choas and confusion when possible. 

(Note: I try to do that by streamlining my decisions. This insightful article, by The New Yorker's Maria Konnikova, explains why I always that's important to me.)

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Try: Morning Pages

In my favorite orange chair vacuuming my brain.

In my favorite orange chair vacuuming my brain.

It's a simple concept: grab a notebook and write out 3 pages in the morning when you first wake up, longhand. Write anything that comes to mind. Do no more than 3 pages, no less. You'll be amazed at how releasing your own stream-of-consciousness clears your mind for the day. I recycle the notebooks once they're full.

If this experiment works for you, hit the heart to let others know they should give it a try!